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Atmospheric Measurement Techniques An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
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Volume 6, issue 3
Atmos. Meas. Tech., 6, 777–785, 2013
https://doi.org/10.5194/amt-6-777-2013
© Author(s) 2013. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.
Atmos. Meas. Tech., 6, 777–785, 2013
https://doi.org/10.5194/amt-6-777-2013
© Author(s) 2013. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.

Research article 19 Mar 2013

Research article | 19 Mar 2013

Technical Note: A novel rocket-based in situ collection technique for mesospheric and stratospheric aerosol particles

W. Reid1, P. Achtert2, N. Ivchenko1, P. Magnusson1, T. Kuremyr1, V. Shepenkov3, and G. Tibert3 W. Reid et al.
  • 1School of Electrical Engineering, Royal Institute of Technology (KTH), Stockholm, Sweden
  • 2Department of Meteorology, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden
  • 3Department of Mechanics, Royal Institute of Technology (KTH), Stockholm, Sweden

Abstract. A technique for collecting aerosol particles between altitudes of 17 and 85 km is described. Spin-stabilized collection probes are ejected from a sounding rocket allowing for multi-point measurements. Each probe is equipped with 110 collection samples that are 3 mm in diameter. The collection samples are one of three types: standard transmission electron microscopy carbon grids, glass fibre filter paper or silicone gel. Collection samples are exposed over a 50 m to 5 km height range with a total of 45 separate ranges. Post-flight electron microscopy will give size-resolved information on particle number, shape and elemental composition. Each collection probe is equipped with a suite of sensors to capture the probe's status during the fall. Parachute recovery systems along with GPS-based localization will ensure that each probe can be located and recovered for post-flight analysis.

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