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Atmospheric Measurement Techniques An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
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Preprints
https://doi.org/10.5194/amt-2019-248
© Author(s) 2019. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.
https://doi.org/10.5194/amt-2019-248
© Author(s) 2019. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

  23 Sep 2019

23 Sep 2019

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A revised version of this preprint was accepted for the journal AMT and is expected to appear here in due course.

Detecting the Melting Layer with a Micro Rain Radar Using a Neural Network Approach

Maren Brast and Piet Markmann Maren Brast and Piet Markmann
  • METEK Meteorologische Messtechnik GmbH, Fritz-Straßmann-Str. 4, 25337 Elmshorn, Germany

Abstract. A new method using the Micro Rain Radar (MRR) to determine the melting layer height is presented. The MRR is a small vertically pointing frequency modulated continuous wave radar which measures Doppler spectra of precipitation. From these Doppler spectra, various variables such as Doppler velocity or spectral width can be derived. The melting layer is visible through a higher reflectivity and an acceleration of the falling particles, among others. These characteristics are fed to a neural network to determine the melting layer height. For the training of the neural network, the melting layer height is determined manually. The neural network is trained and tested using data from two sites covering all seasons. For most cases, it is well able to detect the correct melting layer height. Sensitivity studies show that the neural network is able to handle different settings of the MRR. Comparisons to radiosonde data and cloud radar data show a good agreement in melting layer heights.

Maren Brast and Piet Markmann

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Interactive discussion

Status: closed
Status: closed
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
Printer-friendly Version - Printer-friendly version Supplement - Supplement

Maren Brast and Piet Markmann

Maren Brast and Piet Markmann

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Latest update: 20 Sep 2020
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Short summary
An artificial neural network was trained to identify melting layers in micro rain radar data. It was successfully tested on simple and complex cases, which are difficult to identify for classical approaches, while also providing information on melting layer width.
An artificial neural network was trained to identify melting layers in micro rain radar data. It...
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