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Atmospheric Measurement Techniques An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
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https://doi.org/10.5194/amt-2020-213
© Author(s) 2020. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.
https://doi.org/10.5194/amt-2020-213
© Author(s) 2020. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

  15 Jul 2020

15 Jul 2020

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This preprint is currently under review for the journal AMT.

Evaluation and optimization of ICOS atmospheric station data as part of the labeling process

Camille Yver-Kwok1, Carole Philippon1, Peter Bergamaschi2, Tobias Biermann3, Francescopiero Calzolari4, Huilin Chen5, Sébastien Conil6, Paolo Cristofanelli4, Marc Delmotte1, Juha Hatakka7, Michal Heliasz3, Ove Hermansen8, Kateřina Komínková9, Dagmar Kubistin10, Nicolas Kumps11, Olivier Laurent1, Tuomas Laurila7, Irene Lehner3, Janne Levula12, Matthias Lindauer10, Morgan Lopez1, Ivan Mammarella12, Giovanni Manca2, Per Marklund13, Jean-Marc Metzger14, Meelis Mölder15, Stephen M. Platt9, Michel Ramonet1, Leonard Rivier1, Bert Scheeren5, Mahesh Kumar Sha11, Paul Smith13, Martin Steinbacher16, Gabriela Vítková9, and Simon Wyss16 Camille Yver-Kwok et al.
  • 1Laboratoire des Sciences du Climat et de l’Environnement (LSCE-IPSL), CEA-CNRS-UVSQ, Université Paris-Saclay, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette, France
  • 2European Commission Joint Research Centre (JRC), Via E. Fermi 2749, 21027 Ispra, Italy
  • 3Centre for Environmental and Climate Research, Lund University, Sölvegatan 37, SE-223 62, Lund, Sweden
  • 4National Research Concil of Italy, Institute of Atmospheric Sciences and Climate, Via Gobett 101, 40129 Bologna, Italy
  • 5Centre for Isotope Research (CIO), Energy and Sustainability Research Institute Groningen (ESRIG), University of Groningen, Groningen, the Netherlands
  • 6DRD/OPE, Andra, Bure, 55290, France
  • 7Finnish Meteorological Institute, P.O.Box 503, FI-00101 Helsinki, Finland
  • 8NILU, Norwegian Institute for Air Research, Kjeller, Norway
  • 9Global Change Research Institute of the Czech Academy of Sciences, Brno, Czech Republic
  • 10Meteorologisches Observatorium Hohenpeissenberg, Deutscher Wetterdienst (DWD), 82383 Hohenpeissenberg, Germany
  • 11Royal Belgian Institute for Space Aeronomy (BIRA-IASB), Brussels, Belgium
  • 12Institute for Atmospheric and Earth System Research/Physics, Faculty of Sciences, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland
  • 13Department of Forest Ecology and Management, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Umea, Sweden
  • 14Unité Mixte de Service (UMS 3365), Observatoire des Sciences de l’Univers à La Réunion (OSU-R), Université de la Réunion, Saint-Denis de la Réunion (FR)
  • 15Department of Physical Geography and Ecosystem Science, Lund University,Sölvegatan 12 SE-223 62, Lund, Sweden
  • 16Empa, Laboratory for Air Pollution/Environmental Technology,Dübendorf, Switzerland

Abstract. The Integrated Carbon Observation System (ICOS) is a pan-European research infrastructure which provides harmonized and high precision scientific data on the carbon cycle and the greenhouse gas (GHG) budget. All stations have to undergo a rigorous assessment before being labeled, i.e. receiving approval to join the network. In this paper, we present the labeling process for the ICOS atmospheric network through the 23 stations that have been labeled between November 2017 and November 2019. We describe the labeling steps as well as the quality controls used to verify that the ICOS data (CO2, CH4, CO and meteorological measurements) attain the expected quality level defined within ICOS. To ensure the quality of the GHG data, three to four calibration gases and two target gases, one measured two to three times a day, the other with the calibration gases (twice a month) are measured. The data are controlled on a weekly basis and tests on the station sampling lines are performed twice a year. From these high-quality data, we conclude that regular calibrations of the CO2, CH4 and CO analyzers used here (twice a month) are important in particular for carbon monoxide (CO) due to the analyzer's variability and that reducing the number of calibration injections (from four to three) in a calibration sequence is possible and permits saving gas and extend the calibration gas lifespan. We also show that currently, the on-site water vapor correction test does not deliver quantitative results possibly due to environmental factors. Thus the use of a drying system is strongly recommended. Finally, the mandatory regular intake line tests are shown to be useful to detect artifacts and leaks as shown here via three different examples at the stations.

Camille Yver-Kwok et al.

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Short summary
The Integrated Carbon Observation System (ICOS) is a pan-European research infrastructure which provides harmonized and high precision scientific data on the carbon cycle and the greenhouse gas (GHG) budget. All stations have to undergo a rigorous assessment before being labeled, i.e. receiving approval to join the network. In this paper, we present the labeling process for the ICOS atmospheric network through the 23 stations that have been labeled between November 2017 and November 2019.
The Integrated Carbon Observation System (ICOS) is a pan-European research infrastructure which...
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