Preprints
https://doi.org/10.5194/amt-2020-332
https://doi.org/10.5194/amt-2020-332

  20 Oct 2020

20 Oct 2020

Review status: a revised version of this preprint was accepted for the journal AMT and is expected to appear here in due course.

Dynamic Infrared Gas Analysis from Longleaf Pine Fuelbeds Burned in a Wind Tunnel: Observation of Phenol in Pyrolysis and Combustion Phases

Catherine A. Banach1, Olivia N. Williams1, Ashley M. Bradley1, Russell G. Tonkyn1, Joey Chong2, David R. Weise2, Tanya L. Myers1, and Timothy J. Johnson1 Catherine A. Banach et al.
  • 1Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA USA
  • 2USDA Forest Service, Pacific Southwest Research Station, Riverside, CA, USA

Abstract. Pyrolysis is the first step in a series of chemical and physical processes that produce flammable organic gases from wildland fuels that can result in a wildland fire. We report results using a new time-resolved Fourier transform infrared method that correlates the measured FTIR spectrum to an infrared thermal image sequence enabling identification and quantification of gases within different phases of the fire process. The flame from burning fuel beds composed of pine needles (Pinus palustris) and mixtures of sparkleberry, fetterbush and inkberry plants was the natural heat source for pyrolysis. Extractive gas samples were analyzed and identified in both static and dynamic modes synchronized to thermal infrared imaging: A total of 29 gases were identified including small alkanes, alkenes, aldehydes, nitrogen compounds and aromatics, most previously measured by FTIR in wildland fires. This study presents one of the first identifications of phenol associated with both pre-combustion and combustion phases, using ca. 1 Hz resolution. Preliminary results indicate ~ 2.5× greater phenol emission from sparkleberry and inkberry compared to fetterbush, with differing temporal profiles.

Catherine A. Banach et al.

 
Status: closed
Status: closed
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
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Status: closed
Status: closed
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
Printer-friendly Version - Printer-friendly version Supplement - Supplement

Catherine A. Banach et al.

Catherine A. Banach et al.

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Short summary
We have developed a novel method to identify and characterize the gases emitted in biomass burning fires in a time-resolved fashion. Using time-resolved infrared spectroscopy combined with time-resolved thermal imaging in a wind tunnel, we were able to capture the gas-phase dynamics of the burning of plants native to the southeastern United States.