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Atmospheric Measurement Techniques An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
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Short summary
In the first half of the 20th century, Prof. Dobson developed an instrument to measure the ozone column. Around fifty of these Dobson instruments, manufactured in the second half of the 20th century, are still used today to monitor the ozone layer state. Started in 1926, the Arosa series is based on manually operated Dobson until recently. To assure its future operation, a fully automated version of the Dobson has been developed. This well working automated system is described here.
Preprints
https://doi.org/10.5194/amt-2020-391
https://doi.org/10.5194/amt-2020-391

  10 Dec 2020

10 Dec 2020

Review status: this preprint is currently under review for the journal AMT.

A fully Automated Dobson Sun Spectrophotometer for total column ozone and Umkehr measurements

René Stübi1, Herbert Schill2, Jörg Klausen1, Eliane Maillard Barras1, and Alexander Haefele1 René Stübi et al.
  • 1Federal Office of Meteorology and Climatology, MeteoSwiss, 1530 Payerne, Switzerland
  • 2Physikalisch-Meteorologisches Observatorium / World Radiation Center, 7260 Davos Dorf, Switzerland

Abstract. The longest ozone column measurements series are based on the Dobson sun spectrophotometers developed in the 1920s by Prof. G. B. W. Dobson. These ingenious and robustly designed instruments still constitute an important part of the global network presently. However, the Dobson sun spectrophotometer needs manual operation which leads to the discontinuation of its use at many stations. To overcome this problem, MeteoSwiss developed a fully automated version of the Dobson spectrophotometer. The description of the data acquisition and automated control of the instrument is presented here with some technical details. The results of different tests performed regularly to control the instrument good working operation are illustrated and discussed.

Compared to manual operation, the automation results in higher frequency measurements with lower random error and additional housekeeping information to characterise the measuring conditions. The automated Dobson instrument allows a continuous observation of the ozone column with a resolution of ~1 DU unit under clear sky conditions.

René Stübi et al.

 
Status: open (until 04 Feb 2021)
Status: open (until 04 Feb 2021)
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René Stübi et al.

René Stübi et al.

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Short summary
In the first half of the 20th century, Prof. Dobson developed an instrument to measure the ozone column. Around fifty of these Dobson instruments, manufactured in the second half of the 20th century, are still used today to monitor the ozone layer state. Started in 1926, the Arosa series is based on manually operated Dobson until recently. To assure its future operation, a fully automated version of the Dobson has been developed. This well working automated system is described here.
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