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Atmospheric Measurement Techniques An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
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https://doi.org/10.5194/amt-2020-7
© Author(s) 2020. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.
https://doi.org/10.5194/amt-2020-7
© Author(s) 2020. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

  20 Feb 2020

20 Feb 2020

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A revised version of this preprint was accepted for the journal AMT and is expected to appear here in due course.

Inter-Calibration of nine UV sensing instruments over Antarctica and Greenland since 1980

Clark Weaver1,2, Pawan K. Bhartia1, Dong L. Wu3, Gordon Labow1,4, and David Haffner1,4 Clark Weaver et al.
  • 1Atmospheric Chemistry and Dynamics Branch, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771, USA
  • 2Earth System Science Interdisciplinary Center (ESSIC), University of Maryland College Park, MD 20742, USA
  • 3Climate and Radiation Laboratory, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771, USA
  • 4Science Systems and Applications (SSAI), Inc., Lanham, MD 20706, USA

Abstract. Nadir viewed intensities (radiances) from nine UV sensing satellite instruments are calibrated over the East Antarctic Plateau and Greenland during summer. The calibrated radiances from these UV instruments ultimately will provide a global long-term record of cloud trends and cloud response from ENSO events since 1980. We first remove the strong solar zenith angle dependence from the intensities using an empirical approach rather than a radiative transfer model. Then small multiplicative adjustments are made to these solar zenith angle normalized intensities in order to minimize differences when two or more instruments temporally overlap. While the calibrated intensities show negligible long-term trend over Antarctica, and a statistically insignificant UV albedo trend of −0.05 % per decade over the interior of Greenland, there are small episodic reductions in intensities which are often seen by multiple instruments. Three of these darkening events are explained by boreal forest fires using trajectory modeling analysis. Other events are caused by surface melting or volcanoes. We estimate a 2-sigma uncertainty of 0.35 % for the calibrated radiances.

Clark Weaver et al.

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Clark Weaver et al.

Clark Weaver et al.

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Latest update: 23 Sep 2020
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Short summary
Currently, we don't know if clouds will accelerate or moderate the climate. We look to the past and ask if cloudiness has changed over the last 4 decades. Using a suite of 9 satellite instruments, we need to make sure that the first satellite, which was launched in 1980 and died in 1991, observes the same measurement as the eight other satellite instruments used in the record. So, if the instruments were measuring length and observing a 1.00 meter long stick, they would all see .99 to 1.01 m.
Currently, we don't know if clouds will accelerate or moderate the climate. We look to the past...
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