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Atmospheric Measurement Techniques An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
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Short summary
This manuscript suggests and describes a method for calibrating wind lidars using a rotating flywheel. An uncertainty analysis shows that a standard uncertainty of 0.1 % can be achieved with the main contributor being the width of the laser beam which is in agreement with experimental results. The method can potentially lower the calibration uncertainty of wind lidars which today is often based on cup anemometers and thus lead to better wind assesments and perhaps more widespread use.
Preprints
https://doi.org/10.5194/amt-2020-88
https://doi.org/10.5194/amt-2020-88

  06 Jul 2020

06 Jul 2020

Review status: a revised version of this preprint was accepted for the journal AMT and is expected to appear here in due course.

Flywheel calibration of a continuous-wave coherent Doppler wind lidar

Anders Tegtmeier Pedersen and Pedersen Courtney Anders Tegtmeier Pedersen and Pedersen Courtney
  • Technical University of Denmark – DTU Wind Energy, Frederiksborgvej 399, 4000 Roskilde, Denmark

Abstract. A rig for calibrating a continuous-wave coherent Doppler wind lidar has been constructed. The rig consists of a rotating flywheel on a frame together with an adjustable lidar telescope. The laser beam points toward the rim of the wheel in a plane perpendicular to the wheel's rotation axis, and it can be tilted up and down along the wheel periphery and thereby measure different projections of the tangential speed. The angular speed of the wheel is measured using a high-precision measuring ring fitted to the periphery of the wheel and synchronously logged together with the lidar speed. A simple, geometrical model shows that there is a linear relationship between the measured line-of-sight speed and the beam tilt angle and this is utilised to extrapolate to the tangential speed as measured by the lidar. An analysis of the uncertainties based on the model shows that a standard uncertainty on the measurement of about 0.1 % can be achieved, but also that the main source of uncertainty is the width of the laser beam and it's associated uncertainty. Measurements performed with different beam widths confirms this. Other measurements with a minimised beam radius shows that the method in this case performs about equally well for all the tested reference speeds ranging from about 3 m/s to 18 m/s.

Anders Tegtmeier Pedersen and Pedersen Courtney

 
Status: closed
Status: closed
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
Printer-friendly Version - Printer-friendly version Supplement - Supplement
 
Status: closed
Status: closed
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
Printer-friendly Version - Printer-friendly version Supplement - Supplement

Anders Tegtmeier Pedersen and Pedersen Courtney

Anders Tegtmeier Pedersen and Pedersen Courtney

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Short summary
This manuscript suggests and describes a method for calibrating wind lidars using a rotating flywheel. An uncertainty analysis shows that a standard uncertainty of 0.1 % can be achieved with the main contributor being the width of the laser beam which is in agreement with experimental results. The method can potentially lower the calibration uncertainty of wind lidars which today is often based on cup anemometers and thus lead to better wind assesments and perhaps more widespread use.
Citation