Preprints
https://doi.org/10.5194/amt-2021-14
https://doi.org/10.5194/amt-2021-14

  25 Jan 2021

25 Jan 2021

Review status: this preprint is currently under review for the journal AMT.

Meteor radar observations of polar mesospheric summer echoes over Svalbard

Joel P. Younger1,2, Iain M. Reid1,2, Chris L. Adami1, Chris M. Hall3, and Masaki Tsutsumi4 Joel P. Younger et al.
  • 1ATRAD Pty Ltd, 20 Phillips St, Thebarton, SA, 5031, Australia
  • 2School of Physical Sciences, University of Adelaide, Adelaide, SA, 5005, Australia
  • 3Tromsø Geophysical Observatory, UiT - The Arctic University of Norway, 9037, Tromsø, Norway
  • 4National Institute of Polar Research, 10-3, Midori-cho, Tachikawa-shi, Tokyo 190-8518, Japan

Abstract. A 31 MHz meteor radar located in Svalbard has been used to observe polar mesospheric echoes (PMSE) during summer 2020. Data from 19 July was selected for detailed analysis, with a focus on extracting additional information to characterize the atmosphere in the PMSE region. The use of an all-sky meteor radar adds an additional use to data collected for meteor observations and enables the detection of PMSE layers across a wide field of view. Comparison with data from a 53.5 MHz narrow-beam MST radar shows good agreement in the morphology of the layer as detected between the two systems. Doppler spectra of PMSE layers reveal fine structure, including regions of enhanced return that move across the radar's field of view. The relationship between range and Doppler shift of off-zenith portions of the layer enable the estimation of wind speeds with high temporal resolution during PMSE conditions. Trials demonstrate good agreement between wind speeds obtained from PMSE Doppler spectra and those calculated from specular meteor trail radial velocities. Combined with the antenna polar diagram of the radar, this same relationship was used to infer the aspect sensitivity of observed PMSE backscatter, yielding a mean backscatter angular width of 6.6 ± 2.8°. A comparison of underdense meteor radar echo decay times during and outside of PMSE conditions did not demonstrate a strong correlation between the presence of PMSE and shortened underdense meteor radar echo durations.

Joel P. Younger et al.

Status: open (until 22 Mar 2021)

Comment types: AC – author | RC – referee | CC – community | EC – editor | CEC – chief editor | : Report abuse
  • RC1: 'Comment on amt-2021-14', Anonymous Referee #1, 17 Feb 2021 reply

Joel P. Younger et al.

Joel P. Younger et al.

Viewed

Total article views: 215 (including HTML, PDF, and XML)
HTML PDF XML Total BibTeX EndNote
176 35 4 215 4 2
  • HTML: 176
  • PDF: 35
  • XML: 4
  • Total: 215
  • BibTeX: 4
  • EndNote: 2
Views and downloads (calculated since 25 Jan 2021)
Cumulative views and downloads (calculated since 25 Jan 2021)

Viewed (geographical distribution)

Total article views: 189 (including HTML, PDF, and XML) Thereof 189 with geography defined and 0 with unknown origin.
Country # Views %
  • 1
1
 
 
 
 
Latest update: 02 Mar 2021
Download
Short summary
A radar in Svalbard usually used to study meteor trails was used to observe a thin icy layer in the upper atmosphere. New methods used the layer to measure wind speed over short periods of time and found that the layer is most reflective within 6.6 ± 2.2° of vertical. Analysis of meteor trail radar echo durations found that the layer may shorten meteor trail echoes, but more data is needed. This study shows new uses for data collected by meteor radars for other purposes.