Preprints
https://doi.org/10.5194/amt-2021-228
https://doi.org/10.5194/amt-2021-228

  26 Aug 2021

26 Aug 2021

Review status: this preprint is currently under review for the journal AMT.

A new method to quantify particulate sodium and potassium salts (nitrate, chloride, and sulfate) by thermal desorption aerosol mass spectrometry

Yuya Kobayashi and Nobuyuki Takegawa Yuya Kobayashi and Nobuyuki Takegawa
  • Department of Chemistry, Graduate School of Science, Tokyo Metropolitan University, Hachioji, Tokyo 192-0397, Japan

Abstract. The reaction of sea salt (or biomass burning) particles with sulfuric acid and nitric acid leads to the displacement of chloride relative to sodium (or potassium). We have developed a new particle mass spectrometer to quantify non-refractory and refractory sulfate aerosols (referred to as refractory aerosol thermal desorption mass spectrometer: rTDMS). The combination of a graphite particle collector and a carbon dioxide laser enables high desorption temperature (up to 930 °C). Ion signals originating from evolved gas molecules are detected by a quadrupole mass spectrometer. Here we propose a new method to quantify the mass concentrations of sodium nitrate (NaNO3: SN), sodium chloride (NaCl: SC), sodium sulfate (Na2SO4: SS), potassium nitrate (KNO3: PN), potassium chloride (KCl: PC), and potassium sulfate (K2SO4 : PS) particles by using the rTDMS. Laboratory experiments were performed to test the sensitivities of the rTDMS to various types of particles. We measured ion signals originating from single-component particles for each compound, and found a good linearity (r2 > 0.8) between the major ion signals and mass loadings. We also measured ion signals originating from internally mixed SN + SC + SS (or PN + PC + PS) particles, and found that the temporal profiles of ion signals at m/z 23 (or 39) were characterized by three sequential peaks associated with the evolution of the desorption temperature. We tested potential interferences in the quantification of sea salt particles under real-world conditions by artificially generating "modified" sea salt particles from a mixture of diluted seawater and SS/SN solution. Based on these experimental results, the applicability of the rTDMS to ambient measurements of sea salt particles is discussed.

Yuya Kobayashi and Nobuyuki Takegawa

Status: open (until 30 Sep 2021)

Comment types: AC – author | RC – referee | CC – community | EC – editor | CEC – chief editor | : Report abuse
  • RC1: 'Comment on amt-2021-228', Anonymous Referee #1, 14 Sep 2021 reply

Yuya Kobayashi and Nobuyuki Takegawa

Yuya Kobayashi and Nobuyuki Takegawa

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Short summary
We propose a new method to quantify particulate sodium and potassium salts (nitrate, chloride, and sulfate) by using a refractory aerosol thermal desorption mass spectrometer (rTDMS). The combination of a graphite particle collector and a carbon dioxide laser enables high desorption temperature. Laboratory experiments showed that major ion signals originating from sodium or potassium salts were clearly detected associated with the increase in the desorption temperature by laser heating.