Preprints
https://doi.org/10.5194/amt-2021-252
https://doi.org/10.5194/amt-2021-252

  30 Aug 2021

30 Aug 2021

Review status: this preprint is currently under review for the journal AMT.

Assessment of the quality of ACE-FTS stratospheric ozone data

Patrick E. Sheese1, Kaley A. Walker1, Chris D. Boone2, Adam E. Bourassa3, Doug A. Degenstein3, Lucien Froidevaux4, C. Thomas McElroy5, Donal Murtagh6, James M. Russell III7, and Jiansheng Zou1 Patrick E. Sheese et al.
  • 1University of Toronto, Department of Physics, Toronto, Canada
  • 2University of Waterloo, Department of Chemistry, Waterloo, Canada
  • 3University of Saskatchewan, ISAS, Department of Physics and Engineering, Saskatoon, Canada
  • 4Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, USA
  • 5York University, Department of Earth and Space Science and Engineering, Toronto, Canada
  • 6Chalmers University of Technology, Department of Space, Earth and Environment, Gothenburg, Sweden
  • 7Hampton University, Center for Atmospheric Sciences, Hampton, USA

Abstract. For the past 17 years, the Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment Fourier Transform Spectrometer (ACE-FTS) instrument on the Canadian SCISAT satellite has been measuring profiles of atmospheric ozone. The latest two operational versions of the level 2 ozone data are versions 3.6 and 4.1. This technical note characterizes how both products compare with correlative data from other limb-sounding satellite instruments, namely MAESTRO, MLS, OSIRIS, SABER, and SMR. In general, v3.6, with respect to the other instruments, exhibits a smaller bias (which is on the order of ~3 %) in the middle stratosphere than v4.1 (~2–9 %), however the bias exhibited in the v4.1 data tends to be more stable, i.e. not changing significantly over time in any altitude region. In the lower stratosphere, v3.6 has a positive bias of about 3–5 % that is stable to within ±1 % dec−1, and v4.1 has a bias on the order of −1 to +5 % and is also stable to within ±1 % dec−1. In the middle stratosphere, v3.6 has a positive bias of ~3 % with a significant negative drift on the order of 0.5–2.5 % dec−1, and v4.1 has a positive bias of 2–9 % that is stable to within ±0.5 % dec−1. However, the v4.1 bias in the middle stratosphere is reduced to 0–5 % after being corrected for field-of-view modelling errors. In the upper stratosphere, v3.6 has a positive bias that increases with altitude up to ~16 % and a significant negative drift on the order of 2–3 % dec−1, and v4.1 has a positive bias that increases with altitude up to ~15 % and is stable to within ±1 % dec−1.

Patrick E. Sheese et al.

Status: final response (author comments only)

Comment types: AC – author | RC – referee | CC – community | EC – editor | CEC – chief editor | : Report abuse
  • RC1: 'Comment on amt-2021-252', Chris Sioris, 05 Oct 2021
  • RC2: 'Comment on amt-2021-252', Chris McLinden, 27 Oct 2021

Patrick E. Sheese et al.

Patrick E. Sheese et al.

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Short summary
This study analyzes the quality of two versions (v3.6 and v4.1) of ozone concentration measurements from the ACE-FTS (Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment Fourier Transform Spectrometer), by comparing with data from five satellite instruments between 2004 and 2020. It was found that although the v3.6 data exhibit a better agreement than v4.1 with respect to the other instruments, v4.1 exhibits much better stability over time than v3.6. The stability of v4.1 makes it suitable for ozone trend studies.