Preprints
https://doi.org/10.5194/amt-2021-270
https://doi.org/10.5194/amt-2021-270

  04 Oct 2021

04 Oct 2021

Review status: a revised version of this preprint is currently under review for the journal AMT.

The Aerosol Research Observation Station (AEROS)

Karin Ardon-Dryer1, Mary C. Kelley1, Xia Xueting1,a, and Yuval Dryer1 Karin Ardon-Dryer et al.
  • 1Department of Geosciences, Atmospheric Science Group, Texas Tech University, TX
  • anow at: Department of Statistics, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH, USA

Abstract. Information on atmospheric particles’ concentration and sizes are important for environmental and human health reasons. Air quality monitor stations (AQMSs) for measuring Particulate Matter (PM) concentrations are found across the United States, but only three AQMSs measure PM2.5 concentrations (particles with an aerodynamic diameter of < 2.5 μm) in the Southern High Plains of West Texas (area ≥ 1.8 × 105 km2). This area is prone to many dust events (~21 per year), yet no information is available on other PM sizes, total particle concentration, or size distribution during these events. The Aerosol Research Observation Station (AEROS) was designed to continuously measure these particles’ concentrations to better understand the impact of dust events on local air quality. The AEROS aerosol measurements unit features a temperature-controlled shed with a dedicated inlet and custom-built dryer for each of the three aerosol instruments used. This article provides a description of AEROS as well as an intercomparison of the different instruments using laboratory and atmospheric particles, which shows that the instruments used provided similar concentration measurements. Measurement with AEROS can distinguish between various pollution events (natural dust events vs anthropogenic haze) to improve knowledge of the air quality in this region.

Karin Ardon-Dryer et al.

Status: final response (author comments only)

Comment types: AC – author | RC – referee | CC – community | EC – editor | CEC – chief editor | : Report abuse
  • RC1: 'Comment on amt-2021-270', Anonymous Referee #1, 27 Oct 2021
    • AC1: 'Reply on RC1', Karin Ardon-Dryer, 21 Jan 2022
  • RC2: 'Comment on amt-2021-270', Anonymous Referee #1, 27 Oct 2021
    • AC2: 'Reply on RC2', Karin Ardon-Dryer, 21 Jan 2022
  • RC3: 'Comment on amt-2021-270', Anonymous Referee #2, 13 Dec 2021
    • AC3: 'Reply on RC3', Karin Ardon-Dryer, 21 Jan 2022

Karin Ardon-Dryer et al.

Karin Ardon-Dryer et al.

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Short summary
The Aerosol Research Observation Station (AEROS) located in West Texas, was designed to continuously measure atmospheric particles’ including different PM sizes, total particle concentration, and size distribution. This article provides a description of AEROS as well as an intercomparison of the different instruments using laboratory and atmospheric particles, showing similar concentration, as well to distinguish between various pollution events (natural vs anthropogenic).