Preprints
https://doi.org/10.5194/amt-2021-289
https://doi.org/10.5194/amt-2021-289

  08 Oct 2021

08 Oct 2021

Review status: this preprint is currently under review for the journal AMT.

Top of the Atmosphere Reflected Shortwave Radiative Fluxes from GOES-R

Rachel T. Pinker1, Yingtao Ma1, Wen Chen1, Istvan Laszlo2, Hongqing Liu3, Hye-Yun Kim3, and Jaime Daniels2 Rachel T. Pinker et al.
  • 1Department of Atmospheric and Oceanic Science, University of Maryland, College Park, MD
  • 2NOAA NESDIS Center for Satellite Applications and Research, College Park, MD
  • 3I.M. Systems Group, Inc., Rockville, MD

Abstract. Under the GOES-R activity, new algorithms are being developed at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA)/Center for Satellite Applications and Research (STAR) to derive surface and Top of the Atmosphere (TOA) shortwave (SW) radiative fluxes from the Advanced Baseline Imager (ABI), the primary instrument on GOES-R. This paper describes a support effort in the development and evaluation of the ABI instrument capabilities to derive such fluxes. Specifically, scene dependent narrow-to-broadband (NTB) transformations are developed to facilitate the use of observations from ABI at the TOA. Simulations of NTB transformations have been performed with MODTRAN4.3 using an updated selection of atmospheric profiles as implemented with the final ABI specifications. These are combined with Angular Distribution Models (ADMs), which are a synergy of ADMs from the Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) and from simulations. Surface condition at the scale of the ABI products as needed to compute the TOA radiative fluxes come from the International Geosphere-Biosphere Programme (IGBP). Land classification at 1/6° resolution for 18 surface types are converted to the ABI 2-km grid over the (CONtiguous States of the United States) (CONUS) and subsequently re-grouped to 12 IGBP types to match the classification of the CERES ADMs. In the simulations, default information on aerosols and clouds is based on the ones used in MODTRAN. Comparison of derived fluxes at the TOA is made with those from the CERES and/or the Fast Longwave and Shortwave Radiative Flux (FLASHFlux) data. A satisfactory agreement between the fluxes was observed and possible reasons for differences have been identified; the agreement of the fluxes at the TOA for predominantly clear sky conditions was found to be better than for cloudy sky due to possible time shift in observation times between the two observing systems that might have affected the position of the clouds during such periods.

Rachel T. Pinker et al.

Status: open (until 12 Nov 2021)

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Rachel T. Pinker et al.

Rachel T. Pinker et al.

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Short summary
Under the GOES-R activity, new algorithms are developed at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA)/Center for Satellite Applications and Research (STAR) to derive surface and Top of the Atmosphere (TOA) shortwave (SW) radiative fluxes from the Advanced Baseline Imager (ABI). We describe an effort to support the derivation of such fluxes. Surface SW fluxes are the driving force of the climate system and the new product provides them at unprecedented spatial and temporal scales.