Preprints
https://doi.org/10.5194/amt-2021-304
https://doi.org/10.5194/amt-2021-304

  20 Oct 2021

20 Oct 2021

Review status: this preprint is currently under review for the journal AMT.

Development and Application of a Supervised Pattern Recognition Algorithm for Identification of Fuel-Specific Emissions Profiles

Christos Stamatis and Kelley Claire Barsanti Christos Stamatis and Kelley Claire Barsanti
  • Department of Chemical and Environmental Engineering and College of Engineering – Center for Environmental Research and Technology (CE-CERT), University of California, Riverside, Riverside, CA, USA

Abstract. Wildfires have increased in frequency, duration and size in the western United States (U.S.) over the past decades. These trends are projected to continue, with negative consequences for air quality across the U.S. Wildfires emit large quantities of particles and gases that serve as air pollutants and their precursors, and can lead to severe air quality conditions over large spatial and long temporal scales. Characterization of the chemical constituents in smoke as a function of combustion conditions, fuel type, and fuel component is an important step towards improving the prediction of air quality effects from fires and evaluating mitigation strategies. Building on the comprehensive characterization of gaseous non-methane organic compounds (NMOCs) identified in laboratory and field studies, a supervised pattern recognition algorithm was developed that successfully identified unique chemical speciation profiles among similar fuel types common in western coniferous forests. The algorithm was developed using laboratory data from single fuel species and tested on simplified synthetic fuel mixtures. The fuel types in the synthetic mixtures were differentiated but as the relative mixing proportions became more similar, the differentiation became poorer. Using the results from the pattern recognition algorithm, a classification model based on linear discriminant analysis was trained to differentiate smoke samples based on the contribution(s) of dominant fuel type(s). The classification model was applied to field data and despite the complexity of contributing fuels, and the presence of fuels "unknown" to the classifier, the dominant sources/fuel types were identified correctly. The pattern recognition and classification algorithms are a promising approach for identifying the types of fuels contributing to smoke samples and facilitating selection of appropriate chemical speciation profiles for predictive air quality modeling, using a highly reduced suite of measured NMOCs. Utility and performance of the pattern recognition and classification algorithms can be improved by expanding the training and test sets to include data from a broader range of single and mixed fuel types.

Christos Stamatis and Kelley Claire Barsanti

Status: open (until 18 Dec 2021)

Comment types: AC – author | RC – referee | CC – community | EC – editor | CEC – chief editor | : Report abuse
  • RC1: 'Comment on amt-2021-304', Santtu Mikkonen, 03 Dec 2021 reply
  • RC2: 'Comment on amt-2021-304', Anonymous Referee #2, 06 Dec 2021 reply

Christos Stamatis and Kelley Claire Barsanti

Christos Stamatis and Kelley Claire Barsanti

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Short summary
Building on the identification of hundreds of gas-phase chemicals in smoke samples from laboratory and field studies, an algorithm was developed that successfully identified chemical patterns that were consistent among types of trees and unique between types of trees that are common fuels in western coniferous forests. The algorithm is a promising approach for selecting chemical speciation profiles for air quality modeling using a highly reduced suite of measured compounds.