Preprints
https://doi.org/10.5194/amt-2021-424
https://doi.org/10.5194/amt-2021-424
 
21 Dec 2021
21 Dec 2021
Status: this preprint has been withdrawn by the authors.

Development of an in situ Acoustic Anemometer to Measure Wind in the Stratosphere for SENSOR

Liang Song1,2, Xiong Hu1, Feng Wei1, Zhaoai Yan1,3, Qingchen Xu1, and Cui Tu1,3 Liang Song et al.
  • 1Key Laboratory of Science and Technology on Environmental Space Situation Awareness, National Space Science Center, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190, China
  • 2College of Earth Sciences, University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049, China
  • 3College of Materials Science and Opto-Electronic Technology, University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049, China

Abstract. The Stratospheric Environmental respoNses to Solar stORms (SENSOR) campaign investigates the influence of solar storms on the stratosphere. This campaign employs a long-duration zero-pressure balloon as a platform to carry multiple types of payloads during a series of flight experiments in the mid-latitude stratosphere from 2019 to 2022. This article describes the development and testing of an acoustic anemometer for obtaining in situ wind measurements along the balloon trajectory. Developing this anemometer was necessary, as there is no existing commercial off-the-shelf product, to the authors’ knowledge, capable of obtaining in situ wind measurements on a high-altitude balloon or other similar floating platform in the stratosphere. The anemometer is also equipped with temperature, pressure, and humidity sensors from a Temperature-Pressure-Humidity measurement module, inherited from a radiosonde developed for sounding balloons. The acoustic anemometer and other sensors were used in a flight experiment of the SENSOR campaign that took place in the Da chaidan District (95.37° E, 37.74° N) on 4 September 2019. Three-dimensional wind speed observations, which were obtained during level flight at an altitude of around 25 km, are presented. A preliminary analysis of the measurements yielded by the anemometer are also discussed. In addition to wind speed measurements, temperature, pressure, and relative humidity measurements during ascent are compared to observations from a nearby radiosonde launched four hours earlier. The problems experienced by the acoustic anemometer during the 2019 experiment show that the acoustic anemometer must be improved for future experiments in the SENSOR campaign.

This preprint has been withdrawn.

Liang Song et al.

Interactive discussion

Status: closed

Comment types: AC – author | RC – referee | CC – community | EC – editor | CEC – chief editor | : Report abuse
  • RC1: 'Comment on amt-2021-424', Anonymous Referee #1, 17 Jan 2022
  • RC2: 'Comment on amt-2021-424', Anonymous Referee #2, 21 Jan 2022

Interactive discussion

Status: closed

Comment types: AC – author | RC – referee | CC – community | EC – editor | CEC – chief editor | : Report abuse
  • RC1: 'Comment on amt-2021-424', Anonymous Referee #1, 17 Jan 2022
  • RC2: 'Comment on amt-2021-424', Anonymous Referee #2, 21 Jan 2022

Liang Song et al.

Liang Song et al.

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This preprint has been withdrawn.

Short summary
To capture and characterize the small-scale atmospheric disturbances and possible relations to solar activities, an in situ acoustic anemometer has been developed. It is used to obtain wind measurements in the stratosphere on a high altitude balloon in the Stratospheric Environmental respoNses to Solar stORms (SENSOR) campaign. The anemometer is also equipped with sensors to measure temperature, pressure, and relative humidity. Observations were obtained during a flight experiment in 2019.