Preprints
https://doi.org/10.5194/amt-2021-92
https://doi.org/10.5194/amt-2021-92

  10 Jun 2021

10 Jun 2021

Review status: a revised version of this preprint was accepted for the journal AMT.

Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide Measurement from Aircraft and Comparison with OCO-2 and Carbon Tracker Model Data

Qin Wang1, Farhan Mustafa1, Lingbing Bu1, Shouzheng Zhu1,2, Jiqiao Liu2, and Weibiao Chen2 Qin Wang et al.
  • 1Collaborative Innovation Center on Forecast and Evaluation of Meteorological Disasters, Nanjing University of Information Science and Technology (NUIST), Nanjing, 210044, China
  • 2Key Laboratory of Space Laser Communication and Detection Technology, Shanghai Institute of Optics and Fine Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800, China

Abstract. Accurate monitoring of the atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) and its distribution is of great significance for studying the carbon cycle and predicting the future climate change. Compared to the ground observational sites, the airborne observations cover a wider area, and simultaneously observe a variety of surface types, which help in effectively monitoring the distribution of CO2 sources and sinks. In this work, an airborne experiment was carried out in March 2019 over Shanhaiguan area, China (39–41N,119–121E). An Integrated Path Differential Absorption (IPDA) Light Detection and Ranging (LIDAR) system and a commercial instrument, the Ultraportable Greenhouse Gas Analyzer (UGGA), were used installed on an aircraft to observe the CO2 distribution over various surface types. The Pulse Integration Method (PIM) algorithm was used to calculate the Differential Absorption Optical Depth (DAOD) from the LIDAR data. The CO2 column-averaged dry-air mixing ratio (XCO2) was calculated over different types of surfaces including mountain, ocean and urban areas. The concentrations of the XCO2 calculated from LIDAR measurements over ocean, mountain, and urban areas were 421.11, 427.67, and 430 ppm, respectively. Moreover, through the detailed analysis of the data obtained from the UGGA, the influence of pollution levels on the CO2 concentration was also studied. During the whole flight campaign, March 18 was heavily polluted with an Air Quality Index (AQI) of 175 and PM2.5 of 131. The Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD) reported by a sun photometer installed at the Funning ground station was 1.28. Compared to the other days, the CO2 concentration measured by UGGA at different heights was the largest on March 18 with an average value of 422.59 ppm, that was about 10 ppm higher than the measurements recorded on March 16. Moreover, the vertical profiles of Orbiting Carbon observatory-2 (OCO-2) OCO-2 and CarbonTracker were also compared with the aircraft measurements. All the datasets showed a similar variation trend with some differences in their CO2 concentrations, which proved the existence of a good agreement among them.

Qin Wang et al.

Status: final response (author comments only)

Comment types: AC – author | RC – referee | CC – community | EC – editor | CEC – chief editor | : Report abuse
  • RC1: 'Review of "Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide Measurement from Aircraft and Comparison with OCO-2 and CarbonTracker Model Data" by Wang et al.', Anonymous Referee #1, 05 Jul 2021
    • AC1: 'Reply on RC1', Qin Wang, 02 Sep 2021
  • RC2: 'Comment on amt-2021-92, clarifications needed', Anonymous Referee #2, 12 Jul 2021
    • AC2: 'Reply on RC2', Qin Wang, 02 Sep 2021

Qin Wang et al.

Qin Wang et al.

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Short summary
In this work, an airborne experiment was carried out to validate a newly developed CO2 monitoring IPDA LIDAR against the in-situ measurements obtained from a commercial CO2 monitoring instrument installed on the aircraft. The XCO2 values calculated with the IPDA LIDAR measurements were compared with the dry-air CO2 mole fraction measurements obtained from the in-situ instruments and the results showed a good agreement between the two datasets.