Preprints
https://doi.org/10.5194/amt-2022-114
https://doi.org/10.5194/amt-2022-114
 
14 Jul 2022
14 Jul 2022
Status: this preprint is currently under review for the journal AMT.

Long-term validation of MIPAS ESA operational products using MIPAS-B measurements

Gerald Wetzel1, Michael Höpfner1, Hermann Oelhaf1, Felix Friedl-Vallon1, Anne Kleinert1, Guido Maucher1, Miriam Sinnhuber1, Janna Abalichin2, Angelika Dehn3, and Piera Raspollini4 Gerald Wetzel et al.
  • 1Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Institute of Meteorology and Climate Research, Karlsruhe, Germany
  • 2Freie Universität Berlin, Institute of Meteorology, Berlin, Germany
  • 3European Space Agency (ESA-ESRIN), Frascati, Italy
  • 4Istituto di Fisica Applicata “N. Carrara” (IFAC) del Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche (CNR), Firenze, Italy

Abstract. The Michelson Interferometer for Passive Atmospheric Sounding (MIPAS) was a limb-viewing infrared Fourier transform spectrometer that operated from 2002 to 2012 aboard the Environmental Satellite (ENVISAT). The final re-processing of the full MIPAS mission Level 2 data was performed with the ESA operational version 8 (v8) processor. This MIPAS data set not only includes retrieval results of pressure-temperature and the standard species H2O, O3, HNO3, CH4, N2O, and NO2, but also vertical profiles of volume mixing ratios of the more difficult to retrieve molecules N2O5, ClONO2, CFC-11, CFC-12 (included since v6 processing), HCFC-22, CCl4, CF4, COF2, and HCN (included since v7 processing). Finally, vertical profiles of the species C2H2, C2H6, COCl2, OCS, CH3Cl, and HDO were additionally retrieved by the v8 processor.

The balloon-borne limb-emission sounder MIPAS-B was a precursor of the MIPAS satellite instrument. Several flights with MIPAS-B have been carried out during the 10 years operational phase of ENVISAT at different latitudes and seasons, including both operational periods where MIPAS measured with full spectral resolution (FR mode) and with optimized spectral resolution (OR mode). All MIPAS operational products (except HDO) were compared to results inferred from dedicated validation limb sequences of MIPAS-B. To enhance the statistics of vertical profile comparisons, a trajectory match method has been applied to search for MIPAS coincidences along 2-day forward/backward trajectories running from the MIPAS-B measurement geolocations. This study gives an overview of the validation results based on the ESA operational v8 data comprising the MIPAS FR and OR observation periods. This includes an assessment of the data agreement of both sensors taking into account combined errors of the instruments. The difference between retrieved temperature profiles of both MIPAS instruments generally stays within ±2 K in the stratosphere. For most gases, namely H2O, O3, HNO3, CH4, N2O, NO2, N2O5, ClONO2, CFC-11, CFC-12, HCFC-22, CCl4, CF4, COF2, and HCN we find a 5 % to 20 % agreement of the retrieved vertical profiles of both MIPAS instruments in the lower stratosphere. For the species C2H2, C2H6, COCl2, OCS, and CH3Cl, however, larger differences within 20 % and 50 % appear in this altitude range.

Gerald Wetzel et al.

Status: open (until 18 Aug 2022)

Comment types: AC – author | RC – referee | CC – community | EC – editor | CEC – chief editor | : Report abuse
  • RC1: 'Referee report on amt-2022-114', Anonymous Referee #1, 02 Aug 2022 reply
  • RC2: 'Comment on amt-2022-114', Anonymous Referee #3, 02 Aug 2022 reply

Gerald Wetzel et al.

Gerald Wetzel et al.

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Short summary
Satellite measurements of stratospheric trace gases are essential for monitoring the distribution and trend of these species on a global scale. Here, we compare the final MIPAS ESA Level 2 version 8 data (temperature and trace gases) with measurements obtained with the balloon version of MIPAS in terms of data agreement of both sensors including combined errors. For most gases, we find a 5 % to 20 % agreement of the retrieved vertical profiles of both MIPAS instruments in the lower stratosphere.