Preprints
https://doi.org/10.5194/amt-2023-246
https://doi.org/10.5194/amt-2023-246
07 Feb 2024
 | 07 Feb 2024
Status: this preprint is currently under review for the journal AMT.

Working standard gas saving system for in-situ CO2 and CH4 measurements and calculation method for concentrations and their uncertainty

Motoki Sasakawa, Noritsugu Tsuda, Toshinobu Machida, Mikhail Arshinov, Denis Davydov, Aleksandr Fofonov, and Boris Belan

Abstract. We have developed a container system for in-situ measurement of CO2 and CH4 that significantly reduces the consumption of working standard gases to a level less than one order of magnitude smaller than that required by a common method. It uses on-site compressed air to track the baseline drift of sensors. JR-STATION (Japan-Russia Siberian Tall Tower Inland Observation Network) consisted of this system installed at nine sites in Siberia. The system acquires semi-continuous data by recording several minutes of averaged data after gas replacement time. We have updated the calculation method for deriving CO2 and CH4 concentrations to determine their uncertainty for each data simultaneously. Furthermore, we estimated the system's reproducibility based on the repeated measurement of on-site compressed air. The CO2 and CH4 concentration reproducibility mostly varied by less than 0.2 ppm and five ppb, respectively. Uncertainties of time-averaged data were sometimes higher than the measurement uncertainty for each period, suggesting that the data include atmospheric variability during the measurement period of several minutes. Data users should consider the difference between the two uncertainties to select optimal data, depending on their focusing spatial scale. The CO2 and CH4 data measured with the NDIR and the tin dioxide sensor exhibited good agreement with those measured by the CRDS, respectively.

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Motoki Sasakawa, Noritsugu Tsuda, Toshinobu Machida, Mikhail Arshinov, Denis Davydov, Aleksandr Fofonov, and Boris Belan

Status: final response (author comments only)

Comment types: AC – author | RC – referee | CC – community | EC – editor | CEC – chief editor | : Report abuse
  • RC1: 'Comment on amt-2023-246', Anonymous Referee #1, 26 Mar 2024
  • RC2: 'Comment on amt-2023-246', Anonymous Referee #2, 13 Apr 2024
Motoki Sasakawa, Noritsugu Tsuda, Toshinobu Machida, Mikhail Arshinov, Denis Davydov, Aleksandr Fofonov, and Boris Belan
Motoki Sasakawa, Noritsugu Tsuda, Toshinobu Machida, Mikhail Arshinov, Denis Davydov, Aleksandr Fofonov, and Boris Belan

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Short summary
To accurately monitor atmospheric greenhouse gases, stable measurements are needed. Environmental changes like atmospheric pressure can alter device output. We counteract this by measuring standard gases with known concentrations. However, these gases deplete quickly. To address this, we’ve developed a system using ambient air at the site, reducing standard gas consumption. This paper details the system and a method for calculating concentrations.