Articles | Volume 10, issue 6
Atmos. Meas. Tech., 10, 2377–2382, 2017
https://doi.org/10.5194/amt-10-2377-2017
Atmos. Meas. Tech., 10, 2377–2382, 2017
https://doi.org/10.5194/amt-10-2377-2017

Research article 30 Jun 2017

Research article | 30 Jun 2017

A closed-chamber method to measure greenhouse gas fluxes from dry aquatic sediments

Lukas Lesmeister and Matthias Koschorreck

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Latest update: 07 Dec 2021
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Short summary
Greenhouse gas emissions from dry aquatic sediments are probably globally relevant. However, they are difficult to measure because of the often rocky substrate. We tested the performance of different materials to seal a closed chamber to stony ground both in laboratory and field experiments. Pottery clay was a convenient sealing material, while the use of on-site material produced artefacts. We confirmed that CO2 fluxes from dry aquatic sediments were similar to fluxes from normal soils.