Articles | Volume 12, issue 6
Atmos. Meas. Tech., 12, 3081–3099, 2019
https://doi.org/10.5194/amt-12-3081-2019
Atmos. Meas. Tech., 12, 3081–3099, 2019
https://doi.org/10.5194/amt-12-3081-2019

Research article 06 Jun 2019

Research article | 06 Jun 2019

Aerosol size distributions during the Atmospheric Tomography Mission (ATom): methods, uncertainties, and data products

Charles A. Brock et al.

Data sets

ATom: Merged atmospheric chemistry, trace gases, and aerosols S.C Wofsy, S. Afshar, H. M. Allen, E. Apel, E. C. Asher, B. Barletta, J. Bent, H. Bian, B. C. Biggs, D. R. Blake, N. Blake, I. Bourgeois, C. A. Brock, W. H. Brune, J. W. Budney, T. P. Bui, A. Butler, P. Campuzano-Jost, C. S. Chang, M. Chin, R. Commane, G. Correa, J.D. Crounse, P. D. Cullis, B.C. Daube, D.A. Day, J.M. Dean-Day, J.E. Dibb, J. P. DiGangi, G. S. Diskin, M. Dollner, J. W. Elkins, F. Erdesz, A. M. Fiore, C. M. Flynn, K. Froyd, D. W. Gesler, S. R. Hall, T. F. Hanisco, R. A. Hannun, A. J. Hills, E. J. Hintsa, A. Hoffman, R. S. Hornbrook, L. G. Huey, S. Hughes, J. L. Jimenez, B. J. Johnson, J. M. Katich, R. F. Keeling, M. J. Kim, A. Kupc, L. R. Lait, J.-F. Lamarque, J. Liu, K. McKain, R. J. Mclaughlin, S. Meinardi, D. O. Miller, S. A. Montzka, F. L. Moore, E. J. Morgan, D. M. Murphy, L. T. Murray, B. A. Nault, J. A. Neuman, P. A. Newman, J. M. Nicely, X. Pan, W. Paplawsky, J. Peischl, M. J. Prather, D. J. Price, E. Ray, J. M. Reeves, M. Richardson, A. W. Rollins, K. H. Rosenlof, T. B. Ryerson, E. Scheuer, G. P. Schill, J. C. Schroder, J. P. Schwarz, J. M. St.Clair, S. D. Steenrod, B. B. Stephens, S. A. Strode, C. Sweeney, D. Tanner, A. P. Teng, A. B. Thames, C. R. Thompson, K. Ullmann, P. R. Veres, N. Vieznor, N. L. Wagner, A. Watt, R. Weber, B. Weinzierl, P. Wennberg, C. J. Williamson, J. C. Wilson, G. M. Wolfe, C. T. Woods, and L. H. Zeng https://doi.org/10.3334/ORNLDAAC/1581

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Short summary
From 2016 to 2018 a NASA aircraft profiled the atmosphere from 180 m to ~12 km from the Arctic to the Antarctic over both the Pacific and Atlantic oceans. This program, ATom, sought to sample atmospheric chemical composition to compare with global climate models. We describe the how measurements of particulate matter were made during ATom, and show that the instrument performance was excellent. Data from this project can be used with confidence to evaluate models and compare with satellites.