Articles | Volume 16, issue 5
https://doi.org/10.5194/amt-16-1263-2023
https://doi.org/10.5194/amt-16-1263-2023
Research article
 | 
10 Mar 2023
Research article |  | 10 Mar 2023

Precipitable water vapor retrievals using a ground-based infrared sky camera in subtropical South America

Elion Daniel Hack, Theotonio Pauliquevis, Henrique Melo Jorge Barbosa, Marcia Akemi Yamasoe, Dimitri Klebe, and Alexandre Lima Correia

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Short summary
Water vapor is a key factor when seeking to understand fast-changing processes when clouds and storms form and develop. We show here how images from a calibrated infrared camera can be used to derive how much water vapor there is in the atmosphere at a given time. Comparing our results to an established technique, for a case of stable atmospheric conditions, we found an agreement within 2.8 %. Water vapor sky maps can be retrieved every few minutes, day or night, under partly cloudy skies.