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Atmospheric Measurement Techniques An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
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Volume 3, issue 6
Atmos. Meas. Tech., 3, 1509–1518, 2010
https://doi.org/10.5194/amt-3-1509-2010
© Author(s) 2010. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.
Atmos. Meas. Tech., 3, 1509–1518, 2010
https://doi.org/10.5194/amt-3-1509-2010
© Author(s) 2010. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.

  04 Nov 2010

04 Nov 2010

Doppler Rayleigh/Mie/Raman lidar for wind and temperature measurements in the middle atmosphere up to 80 km

G. Baumgarten G. Baumgarten
  • Leibniz-Institute of Atmospheric Physics at the Rostock University, 18225 Kühlungsborn, Germany

Abstract. A direct detection Doppler lidar for measuring wind speed in the middle atmosphere up to 80 km with 2 h resolution was implemented in the ALOMAR Rayleigh/Mie/Raman lidar (69° N, 16° E). The random error of the line of sight wind is about 0.6 m/s and 10 m/s at 49 km and 80 km, respectively. We use a Doppler Rayleigh Iodine Spectrometer (DoRIS) at the iodine line 1109 (~532.260 nm). DoRIS uses two branches of intensity cascaded channels to cover the dynamic range from 10 to 100 km altitude. The wind detection system was designed to extend the existing multi-wavelength observations of aerosol and temperature performed at wavelengths of 355 nm, 532 nm and 1064 nm. The lidar uses two lasers with a mean power of 14 W at 532 nm each and two 1.8 m diameter tiltable telescopes. Below about 49 km altitude the accuracy and time resolution is limited by the maximum count rate of the detectors used and not by the number of photons available. We report about the first simultaneous Rayleigh temperature and wind measurements by lidar in the strato- and mesosphere on 17 and 23 January 2009.

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