Preprints
https://doi.org/10.5194/amt-2021-58
https://doi.org/10.5194/amt-2021-58

  25 Mar 2021

25 Mar 2021

Review status: this preprint is currently under review for the journal AMT.

Tracking aerosols and SO2 clouds from the Raikoke eruption: 3D view from satellite observations

Nick Gorkavyi1, Nickolay Krotkov2, Can Li3, Leslie Lait1, Peter Colarco2, Simon Carn4, Matthew DeLand1, Paul Newman2, Mark Schoeberl5, Ghassan Taha2,6, Omar Torres2, Alexander Vasilkov1, and Joanna Joiner2 Nick Gorkavyi et al.
  • 1Science Systems and Applications, Lanham, MD, USA
  • 2NASA, Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD, USA
  • 3University of Maryland, College Park, MD, USA
  • 4Michigan Technological University, Houghton, MI, USA
  • 5Science and Technology Corporation, Columbia, MD, USA
  • 6USRA, Greenbelt, MD, USA

Abstract. The June 21, 2019 eruption of the Raikoke volcano (Kuril Islands, Russia, 48°N, 153°E) produced significant amounts of volcanic aerosols (sulfate and ash) and sulfur dioxide (SO2) gas that penetrated into the lower stratosphere. The dispersed SO2 and sulfate aerosols in the stratosphere were still detectable by multiple satellite sensors for three months after the eruption. For this study of SO2 and aerosol clouds we use data obtained from two of the Ozone Mapping Profiler Suite (OMPS) sensors on the Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (SNPP) satellite: total column SO2 from the Nadir Mapper (NM) and aerosol extinction profiles from the Limb Profiler (LP) as well as other satellite data sets. The LP standard aerosol extinction product at 674 nm has been re-processed with an adjustment correcting for limb viewing geometry effects. It was shown that the amount of SO2 decreases with a characteristic period of 8–18 days and the peak of sulfate aerosol recorded at a wavelength of 674 nm lags the initial peak of SO2 by 1.5 months. Using satellite observations and a trajectory model, we examined the dynamics of unusual atmospheric feature that was observed, a stratospheric coherent circular cloud (CCC) of SO2 and aerosol from July 18 to September 22, 2019.

Nick Gorkavyi et al.

Status: open (until 20 May 2021)

Comment types: AC – author | RC – referee | CC – community | EC – editor | CEC – chief editor | : Report abuse
  • CC1: 'Comment on amt-2021-58', Forrest Mims, 06 Apr 2021 reply
  • RC1: 'Comment on amt-2021-58', Anonymous Referee #3, 21 Apr 2021 reply
  • RC2: 'Comment on amt-2021-58', Michael Fromm, 22 Apr 2021 reply

Nick Gorkavyi et al.

Nick Gorkavyi et al.

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Short summary
The June 21, 2019 eruption of the Raikoke volcano produced significant amounts of volcanic aerosols (sulfate and ash) and sulfur dioxide (SO2) gas that penetrated into the lower stratosphere. It was shown that the amount of SO2 decreases with a characteristic period of 8–18 days and the peak of sulfate aerosol lags the initial peak of SO2 by 1.5 months. Also we examined the dynamics of unusual a stratospheric coherent circular cloud of SO2 and aerosol that was observed from 07/18 to 10/22/2019.