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Atmospheric Measurement Techniques An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
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Volume 10, issue 11
Atmos. Meas. Tech., 10, 4253–4277, 2017
https://doi.org/10.5194/amt-10-4253-2017
© Author(s) 2017. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.
Atmos. Meas. Tech., 10, 4253–4277, 2017
https://doi.org/10.5194/amt-10-4253-2017
© Author(s) 2017. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.

Research article 10 Nov 2017

Research article | 10 Nov 2017

Depolarization calibration and measurements using the CANDAC Rayleigh–Mie–Raman lidar at Eureka, Canada

Emily M. McCullough et al.

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Status: closed
Status: closed
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
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Peer review completion

AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
AR by Emily McCullough on behalf of the Authors (11 Aug 2017)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Referee Nomination & Report Request started (13 Aug 2017) by Ulla Wandinger
RR by Anonymous Referee #2 (27 Aug 2017)
RR by Anonymous Referee #1 (29 Aug 2017)
RR by Anonymous Referee #3 (02 Sep 2017)
ED: Publish subject to minor revisions (Editor review) (09 Sep 2017) by Ulla Wandinger
AR by Emily McCullough on behalf of the Authors (17 Sep 2017)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Publish as is (22 Sep 2017) by Ulla Wandinger
Publications Copernicus
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Short summary
CRL lidar in the Canadian High Arctic uses lasers and a telescope to study polar clouds, essential for understanding the changing global climate. Hardware added to CRL allows it to measure the polarization of returned laser light, indicating whether cloud particles are liquid or frozen. Calibrations show that traditional analysis methods work well, although CRL was not originally set up to make this type of measurement. CRL can now measure cloud particle phase every 5 min, every 37.5 m, 24h/day.
CRL lidar in the Canadian High Arctic uses lasers and a telescope to study polar clouds,...
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