Articles | Volume 11, issue 12
https://doi.org/10.5194/amt-11-6735-2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/amt-11-6735-2018
Research article
 | 
19 Dec 2018
Research article |  | 19 Dec 2018

A fully autonomous ozone, aerosol and nighttime water vapor lidar: a synergistic approach to profiling the atmosphere in the Canadian oil sands region

Kevin B. Strawbridge, Michael S. Travis, Bernard J. Firanski, Jeffrey R. Brook, Ralf Staebler, and Thierry Leblanc

Viewed

Total article views: 3,062 (including HTML, PDF, and XML)
HTML PDF XML Total BibTeX EndNote
2,055 937 70 3,062 89 285
  • HTML: 2,055
  • PDF: 937
  • XML: 70
  • Total: 3,062
  • BibTeX: 89
  • EndNote: 285
Views and downloads (calculated since 23 May 2018)
Cumulative views and downloads (calculated since 23 May 2018)

Viewed (geographical distribution)

Total article views: 3,062 (including HTML, PDF, and XML) Thereof 2,845 with geography defined and 217 with unknown origin.
Country # Views %
  • 1
1
 
 
 
 

Cited

Latest update: 29 May 2024
Download
Short summary
Environment and Climate Change Canada has recently developed a fully autonomous, mobile lidar system to simultaneously measure the vertical profile of tropospheric ozone, aerosol and water vapor from near the ground to altitudes reaching 10–15 km. These atmospheric constituents play an important role in climate, air quality, and human and ecosystem health. Using an autonomous multi-lidar approach provides a continuous dataset rich in information for atmospheric process studies.