Articles | Volume 14, issue 3
https://doi.org/10.5194/amt-14-2543-2021
https://doi.org/10.5194/amt-14-2543-2021
Research article
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01 Apr 2021
Research article | Highlight paper |  | 01 Apr 2021

Airborne measurements of oxygen concentration from the surface to the lower stratosphere and pole to pole

Britton B. Stephens, Eric J. Morgan, Jonathan D. Bent, Ralph F. Keeling, Andrew S. Watt, Stephen R. Shertz, and Bruce C. Daube

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Latest update: 14 Jun 2024
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Short summary
We describe methods used to make high-precision global-scale airborne measurements of atmospheric oxygen concentrations over a period of 20 years in order to study the global carbon cycle. Our techniques include an in situ vacuum ultraviolet absorption instrument and a pressure- and flow-controlled, cryogenically dried, glass flask sampler. We have deployed these instruments in 15 airborne research campaigns spanning from the Earth’s surface to the lower stratosphere and from pole to pole.