Articles | Volume 15, issue 3
https://doi.org/10.5194/amt-15-655-2022
https://doi.org/10.5194/amt-15-655-2022
Research article
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09 Feb 2022
Research article | Highlight paper |  | 09 Feb 2022

Evaluating the PurpleAir monitor as an aerosol light scattering instrument

James R. Ouimette, William C. Malm, Bret A. Schichtel, Patrick J. Sheridan, Elisabeth Andrews, John A. Ogren, and W. Patrick Arnott

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Latest update: 13 Apr 2024
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Short summary
We show that the low-cost PurpleAir sensor can be characterized as a cell-reciprocal nephelometer. At two very different locations (Mauna Loa Observatory in Hawaii and the Table Mountain rural site in Colorado), the PurpleAir measurements are highly correlated with the submicrometer aerosol scattering coefficient measured by a research-grade integrating nephelometer. These results imply that, with care, PurpleAir data may be used to evaluate climate and air quality models.