Articles | Volume 12, issue 5
Atmos. Meas. Tech., 12, 2949–2966, 2019
https://doi.org/10.5194/amt-12-2949-2019
Atmos. Meas. Tech., 12, 2949–2966, 2019
https://doi.org/10.5194/amt-12-2949-2019

Research article 29 May 2019

Research article | 29 May 2019

Quantification of CO2 and CH4 emissions over Sacramento, California, based on divergence theorem using aircraft measurements

Ju-Mee Ryoo et al.

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Interactive discussion

Status: closed
Status: closed
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
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Peer-review completion

AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
AR by Ju-Mee Ryoo on behalf of the Authors (28 Feb 2019)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Referee Nomination & Report Request started (06 Mar 2019) by Christoph Kiemle
RR by Anonymous Referee #2 (18 Mar 2019)
RR by Anonymous Referee #1 (21 Mar 2019)
ED: Publish subject to minor revisions (review by editor) (25 Mar 2019) by Christoph Kiemle
AR by Ju-Mee Ryoo on behalf of the Authors (04 Apr 2019)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Publish subject to minor revisions (review by editor) (11 Apr 2019) by Christoph Kiemle
AR by Ju-Mee Ryoo on behalf of the Authors (18 Apr 2019)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Publish as is (26 Apr 2019) by Christoph Kiemle
AR by Ju-Mee Ryoo on behalf of the Authors (04 May 2019)  Author's response    Manuscript
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Short summary
We designed cylindrical flights and computed the emission fluxes using a kriging method and Gauss's theorem over Sacramento, California. Differences in wind treatment and background affect the emission estimates by a factor of 1.5 to 7. The effects of the vertical layer average and the vertical mass transfer on the emission estimates are found to be small, esp. local scale. The result also suggests a closed-shape flight profile can better contain total emissions than a one-sided curtain flight.