Articles | Volume 13, issue 2
https://doi.org/10.5194/amt-13-429-2020
https://doi.org/10.5194/amt-13-429-2020
Research article
 | 
05 Feb 2020
Research article |  | 05 Feb 2020

Determining the daytime Earth radiative flux from National Institute of Standards and Technology Advanced Radiometer (NISTAR) measurements

Wenying Su, Patrick Minnis, Lusheng Liang, David P. Duda, Konstantin Khlopenkov, Mandana M. Thieman, Yinan Yu, Allan Smith, Steven Lorentz, Daniel Feldman, and Francisco P. J. Valero

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Latest update: 24 Jun 2024
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Short summary
The Deep Space Climate Observatory (DSCOVR) provides continuous full-disk global broadband irradiance measurements over most of the sunlit side of the Earth. The three active cavity radiometers measure the total radiant energy from the sunlit side of the Earth in shortwave (SW; 0.2–4 µm), total (0.4–100 µm), and near-infrared (NIR; 0.7–4 µm) channels. In this paper, the algorithm used to derive daytime shortwave and longwave fluxes from NISTAR measurements is presented.