Articles | Volume 13, issue 2
Atmos. Meas. Tech., 13, 429–443, 2020
https://doi.org/10.5194/amt-13-429-2020
Atmos. Meas. Tech., 13, 429–443, 2020
https://doi.org/10.5194/amt-13-429-2020

Research article 05 Feb 2020

Research article | 05 Feb 2020

Determining the daytime Earth radiative flux from National Institute of Standards and Technology Advanced Radiometer (NISTAR) measurements

Wenying Su et al.

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Interactive discussion

Status: closed
Status: closed
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
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Peer-review completion

AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
AR by Wenying Su on behalf of the Authors (22 Oct 2019)  Author's response
ED: Referee Nomination & Report Request started (10 Nov 2019) by Jun Wang
RR by Anonymous Referee #3 (18 Nov 2019)
RR by Anonymous Referee #4 (07 Dec 2019)
RR by Anonymous Referee #2 (07 Dec 2019)
ED: Publish subject to minor revisions (review by editor) (16 Dec 2019) by Jun Wang
AR by Wenying Su on behalf of the Authors (16 Dec 2019)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Publish as is (09 Jan 2020) by Jun Wang
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Short summary
The Deep Space Climate Observatory (DSCOVR) provides continuous full-disk global broadband irradiance measurements over most of the sunlit side of the Earth. The three active cavity radiometers measure the total radiant energy from the sunlit side of the Earth in shortwave (SW; 0.2–4 µm), total (0.4–100 µm), and near-infrared (NIR; 0.7–4 µm) channels. In this paper, the algorithm used to derive daytime shortwave and longwave fluxes from NISTAR measurements is presented.