Articles | Volume 14, issue 3
https://doi.org/10.5194/amt-14-1783-2021
https://doi.org/10.5194/amt-14-1783-2021
Research article
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04 Mar 2021
Research article | Highlight paper |  | 04 Mar 2021

Comparison of ozone measurement methods in biomass burning smoke: an evaluation under field and laboratory conditions

Russell W. Long, Andrew Whitehill, Andrew Habel, Shawn Urbanski, Hannah Halliday, Maribel Colón, Surender Kaushik, and Matthew S. Landis

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Latest update: 24 May 2024
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Short summary
This manuscript details field and laboratory-based evaluations of ozone monitoring methods in smoke. UV photometry, the most widely used measurement method for ozone in ambient air, was shown to suffer from a severe positive interference when operated in the presence of smoke, while chemiluminescence-based methods were shown to be free of interferences. The results detailed in this paper will provide monitoring agencies with the tools needed to address smoke-related ozone measurement challenges.