Articles | Volume 14, issue 3
Atmos. Meas. Tech., 14, 2237–2260, 2021
https://doi.org/10.5194/amt-14-2237-2021
Atmos. Meas. Tech., 14, 2237–2260, 2021
https://doi.org/10.5194/amt-14-2237-2021

Research article 23 Mar 2021

Research article | 23 Mar 2021

Aerosol pH indicator and organosulfate detectability from aerosol mass spectrometry measurements

Melinda K. Schueneman et al.

Data sets

DC3 Data DC3 Science Team https://doi.org/10.5067/Aircraft/DC3/DC8/Aerosol-TraceGas

SEAC4RS Data SEAC4RS Science Team https://doi.org/10.5067/Aircraft/SEAC4RS/Aerosol-TraceGas-Cloud

WINTER Data WINTER Science Team https://data.eol.ucar.edu/master_lists/generated/winter/

KORUS-AQ Data KORUS-AQ Science Team https://doi.org/10.5067/Suborbital/KORUSAQ/DATA01

NWS Daily Climatology Data: 1972 (SNF) F. G. Hall, K. F. Huemmrich, D. E. Strebel, S. J. Goetz, J. E. Nickeson, and K. D. Woods https://doi.org/10.3334/ORNLDAAC/158

geoschem/geos-chem: GEOS-Chem 12.6.1 (Version 12.6.1) The International GEOS-Chem User Community https://doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.3520966

Download
Short summary
This work focuses on two important properties of the aerosol, acidity, and sulfate composition, which is important for our understanding of aerosol health and environmental impacts. We explore different methods to understand the composition of the aerosol with measurements from a specific instrument and apply those methods to a large dataset. These measurements are confounded by other factors, making it challenging to predict aerosol sulfate composition; pH estimations, however, show promise.