Articles | Volume 14, issue 3
Atmos. Meas. Tech., 14, 2327–2343, 2021
https://doi.org/10.5194/amt-14-2327-2021
Atmos. Meas. Tech., 14, 2327–2343, 2021
https://doi.org/10.5194/amt-14-2327-2021

Research article 26 Mar 2021

Research article | 26 Mar 2021

Monitoring sudden stratospheric warmings using radio occultation: a new approach demonstrated based on the 2009 event

Ying Li et al.

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Interactive discussion

Status: closed
Status: closed
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
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Peer-review completion

AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
AR by Svenja Lange on behalf of the Authors (15 Oct 2020)  Author's response
ED: Reconsider after major revisions (23 Oct 2020) by Roeland Van Malderen
ED: Referee Nomination & Report Request started (26 Nov 2020) by Roeland Van Malderen
RR by Anonymous Referee #3 (08 Dec 2020)
RR by Anonymous Referee #1 (14 Dec 2020)
RR by Anonymous Referee #2 (24 Dec 2020)
ED: Publish subject to minor revisions (review by editor) (13 Jan 2021) by Roeland Van Malderen
AR by Ying Li on behalf of the Authors (28 Jan 2021)  Author's response    Author's tracked changes    Manuscript
ED: Publish as is (28 Jan 2021) by Roeland Van Malderen
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Short summary
We introduce a new method to detect and monitor sudden stratospheric warming (SSW) events using Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) radio occultation (RO) data at high northern latitudes and demonstrate it for the well-known Jan.–Feb. 2009 event. We found that RO data are capable of SSW monitoring. Based on our method, a SSW event can be detected and tracked, and the duration and the strength of the event can be recorded. The results are consistent with other research on the 2009 event.