Articles | Volume 11, issue 5
Atmos. Meas. Tech., 11, 2653–2668, 2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/amt-11-2653-2018
Atmos. Meas. Tech., 11, 2653–2668, 2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/amt-11-2653-2018

Research article 07 May 2018

Research article | 07 May 2018

How well can global chemistry models calculate the reactivity of short-lived greenhouse gases in the remote troposphere, knowing the chemical composition

Michael J. Prather et al.

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Latest update: 13 May 2021
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Short summary
A new protocol for merging in situ atmospheric chemistry measurements with 3-D models is developed. This technique can identify the most reactive air parcels in terms of tropospheric production/loss of O3 & CH4. This approach highlights differences in 6 global chemistry models even with composition specified. Thus in situ measurements from, e.g., NASA's ATom mission can be used to develop a chemical climatology of, not only the key species, but also the rates of key reactions in each air parcel.