Articles | Volume 15, issue 8
Atmos. Meas. Tech., 15, 2479–2502, 2022
https://doi.org/10.5194/amt-15-2479-2022
Atmos. Meas. Tech., 15, 2479–2502, 2022
https://doi.org/10.5194/amt-15-2479-2022
Research article
25 Apr 2022
Research article | 25 Apr 2022

Evaluating convective planetary boundary layer height estimations resolved by both active and passive remote sensing instruments during the CHEESEHEAD19 field campaign

James B. Duncan Jr. et al.

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Interactive discussion

Status: closed

Comment types: AC – author | RC – referee | CC – community | EC – editor | CEC – chief editor | : Report abuse
  • RC1: 'Review of Evaluating daytime planetary boundary-layer height estimations resolved by both active and passive remote sensing instruments during the CHEESEHEAD19 field campaign', Anonymous Referee #1, 07 Jan 2022
  • RC2: 'Comment on amt-2021-363', Anonymous Referee #3, 10 Jan 2022
  • RC3: 'Comment on amt-2021-363', Anonymous Referee #2, 10 Jan 2022

Peer review completion

AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
AR by Laura Bianco on behalf of the Authors (02 Mar 2022)  Author's response    Author's tracked changes    Manuscript
ED: Publish as is (03 Mar 2022) by Vassilis Amiridis
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Short summary
In this study, several ground-based remote sensing instruments are used to estimate the height of the convective planetary boundary layer, and their performance is compared against independent boundary layer depth estimates obtained from radiosondes launched as part of the CHEESEHEAD19 field campaign. The impact of clouds (particularly boundary layer clouds) on the estimation of the boundary layer depth is also investigated.