Articles | Volume 15, issue 18
https://doi.org/10.5194/amt-15-5497-2022
https://doi.org/10.5194/amt-15-5497-2022
Research article
 | 
27 Sep 2022
Research article |  | 27 Sep 2022

A new machine-learning-based analysis for improving satellite-retrieved atmospheric composition data: OMI SO2 as an example

Can Li, Joanna Joiner, Fei Liu, Nickolay A. Krotkov, Vitali Fioletov, and Chris McLinden

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Latest update: 21 Apr 2024
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Short summary
Satellite observations provide information on the sources of SO2, an important pollutant that affects both air quality and climate. However, these observations suffer from relatively poor data quality due to weak signals of SO2. Here, we use a machine learning technique to analyze satellite SO2 observations in order to reduce the noise and artifacts over relatively clean areas while keeping the signals near pollution sources. This leads to significant improvement in satellite SO2 data.