Articles | Volume 15, issue 10
Atmos. Meas. Tech., 15, 3189–3192, 2022
https://doi.org/10.5194/amt-15-3189-2022
Atmos. Meas. Tech., 15, 3189–3192, 2022
https://doi.org/10.5194/amt-15-3189-2022
Peer-reviewed comment
25 May 2022
Peer-reviewed comment | 25 May 2022

Comment on “Comparison of ozone measurement methods in biomass burning smoke: an evaluation under field and laboratory conditions” by Long et al. (2021)

Noah Bernays et al.

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Interactive discussion

Status: closed

Comment types: AC – author | RC – referee | CC – community | EC – editor | CEC – chief editor | : Report abuse
  • RC1: 'Comment on amt-2022-11', Anonymous Referee #1, 26 Jan 2022
    • AC1: 'Reply on RC1 and RC2', D.A.J. Jaffe, 26 Mar 2022
  • RC2: 'Comment on amt-2022-11', Anonymous Referee #2, 09 Mar 2022
    • AC1: 'Reply on RC1 and RC2', D.A.J. Jaffe, 26 Mar 2022

Peer review completion

AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
AR by D.A.J. Jaffe on behalf of the Authors (01 Apr 2022)  Author's response    Author's tracked changes    Manuscript
ED: Publish as is (04 Apr 2022) by Glenn Wolfe
Short summary
Ozone is an important pollutant that impacts millions of people worldwide. It is therefore important to ensure accurate measurements. A recent surge in wildfire activity in the USA has resulted in significant enhancements in ozone concentration. However given the nature of wildfire smoke, there are questions about our ability to accurately measure ozone. In this comment, we discuss possible biases in the UV measurements of ozone in the presence of smoke.