Articles | Volume 11, issue 3
Atmos. Meas. Tech., 11, 1777–1792, 2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/amt-11-1777-2018
Atmos. Meas. Tech., 11, 1777–1792, 2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/amt-11-1777-2018

Research article 28 Mar 2018

Research article | 28 Mar 2018

Intra-urban spatial variability of surface ozone in Riverside, CA: viability and validation of low-cost sensors

Kira Sadighi et al.

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Interactive discussion

Status: closed
Status: closed
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
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Peer-review completion

AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
AR by Kira Sadighi on behalf of the Authors (06 Jan 2018)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Referee Nomination & Report Request started (15 Jan 2018) by William R. Simpson
RR by Anonymous Referee #1 (23 Jan 2018)
RR by Anonymous Referee #2 (29 Jan 2018)
ED: Publish subject to minor revisions (review by editor) (30 Jan 2018) by William R. Simpson
AR by Kira Sadighi on behalf of the Authors (09 Feb 2018)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Publish as is (13 Feb 2018) by William R. Simpson
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Short summary
Ground-level ozone has negative human health impacts. In the summer of 2015, 13 low-cost sensor monitors were deployed to several neighborhoods around Riverside, California. There were significant spatial differences between monitors. This is important because it means that ozone in certain places may be higher than what EPA monitors report for an area, which is pertinent for residents of those communities. This research helps inform the limitations and advantages of low-cost sensor networks.