Articles | Volume 11, issue 6
Atmos. Meas. Tech., 11, 3221–3249, 2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/amt-11-3221-2018
Atmos. Meas. Tech., 11, 3221–3249, 2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/amt-11-3221-2018

Research article 06 Jun 2018

Research article | 06 Jun 2018

Design, construction and commissioning of the Braunschweig Icing Wind Tunnel

Stephan E. Bansmer et al.

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Status: closed
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AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
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Peer-review completion

AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
AR by Anna Mirena Feist-Polner on behalf of the Authors (09 Feb 2018)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Referee Nomination & Report Request started (19 Feb 2018) by Wiebke Frey
ED: Publish subject to minor revisions (review by editor) (08 Mar 2018) by Wiebke Frey
AR by Anna Wenzel on behalf of the Authors (05 Apr 2018)  Author's response
ED: Publish subject to minor revisions (review by editor) (10 Apr 2018) by Wiebke Frey
AR by Stephan E Bansmer on behalf of the Authors (13 Apr 2018)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Publish subject to minor revisions (review by editor) (19 Apr 2018) by Wiebke Frey
AR by Stephan E Bansmer on behalf of the Authors (23 Apr 2018)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Publish as is (25 Apr 2018) by Wiebke Frey
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Short summary
Snow, frost formation and ice cubes in our drinks are part of our daily life. But what about our technical innovations like aviation, electrical power transmission and wind-energy production, can they cope with icing? Icing Wind Tunnels are an ideal laboratory environment to answer that question. In this paper, we show how the icing wind tunnel in Braunschweig (Germany) was built and how we can use it for engineering and climate research.