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AMT | Articles | Volume 11, issue 8
Atmos. Meas. Tech., 11, 4797–4807, 2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/amt-11-4797-2018
© Author(s) 2018. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.
Atmos. Meas. Tech., 11, 4797–4807, 2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/amt-11-4797-2018
© Author(s) 2018. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

Research article 16 Aug 2018

Research article | 16 Aug 2018

Portable ozone calibration source independent of changes in temperature, pressure and humidity for research and regulatory applications

John W. Birks et al.

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Cited articles

Bates, D. R., and Nicolet, M.: The photochemistry of atmospheric water vapor, J. Geophys. Res., 55, 301–307, 1950. 
Beard, M. E., Margeson, J. H., and Ellis, E. C.: Evaluation of 1 percent neutral buffered potassium iodide solution for calibration of ozone monitors, Report No. EPA-600/4-77-005, Office of Research and Development, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, North Carolina, 1977. 
Birks, J. W.: Oxidant formation in the troposphere, in: Perspectives in Environmental Chemistry, edited by: Macalady, D. L., Oxford University Press, 233–256, 1998. 
Burkholder, J. B., Sander, S. P., Abbatt, J., Barker, J. R., Huie, R. E., Kolb, C. E., Kurylo, M. J., Orkin, V. L., Wilmouth, D. M., and Wine, P. H.: Chemical Kinetics and Photochemical Data for Use in Atmospheric Studies, Evaluation No. 18, JPL Publication 15-10, Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, 2015. 
Cantrell, C. A., Zimmer, A., and Tyndall, G. S.: Absorption cross sections for water vapor from 183 to 193 nm, Geophys. Res. Lett., 24, 2195–2198, 1997. 
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Short summary
A highly portable ozone calibration source based on the photolysis of oxygen is described and evaluated. The ozone mixing ratio produced is independent of both pressure and temperature, and humidity effects are small and correctable. The resulting O3 calibrator has a response time < 20 s, a precision of 0.4 %, and can serve as a U.S. EPA level 4 transfer standard for the calibration of ozone analyzers.
A highly portable ozone calibration source based on the photolysis of oxygen is described and...
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