Articles | Volume 14, issue 11
Atmos. Meas. Tech., 14, 6973–6990, 2021
https://doi.org/10.5194/amt-14-6973-2021
Atmos. Meas. Tech., 14, 6973–6990, 2021
https://doi.org/10.5194/amt-14-6973-2021
Research article
 | Highlight paper
04 Nov 2021
Research article  | Highlight paper | 04 Nov 2021

A differential emissivity imaging technique for measuring hydrometeor mass and type

Dhiraj K. Singh et al.

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Cited articles

Alcott, T. I. and Steenburgh, W. J.: Snow-to-liquid ratio variability and prediction at a high-elevation site in Utah’s Wasatch Mountains, Weather Forecast., 25, 323–337, 2010. a, b
Barthazy, E., Goke, S., Schefold, R., and Hogl, D.: An optical array instrument for shape and fall velocity measurements of hydrometeors, J. Atmos. Ocean. Tech., 21, 1400–1416, 2004. a
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Bergman, T. L., Incropera, F. P., Lavine, A. S., and DeWitt, D. P.: Introduction to heat transfer, John Wiley & Sons, Hoboken, New Jersey,​​​​​​​ 2011. a
Brandes, E. A., Ikeda, K., Zhang, G., Schonhuber, M., and Rasmussen, R. M.: A statistical and physical description of hydrometeor distributions in Colorado snowstorms using a video disdrometer, J. Appl. Meteorol. Clim., 46, 634–650, 2007. a
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Short summary
This paper describes a new instrument for quantifying the physical characteristics of hydrometeors such as snow and rain. The device can measure the mass, size, density and type of individual hydrometeors as well as their bulk properties. The instrument is called the Differential Emissivity Imaging Disdrometer (DEID) and is composed of a thermal camera and hotplate. The DEID measures hydrometeors at sampling frequencies up to 1 Hz with masses and effective diameters greater than 1 µg and 200 µm.