Articles | Volume 12, issue 12
Atmos. Meas. Tech., 12, 6259–6272, 2019
https://doi.org/10.5194/amt-12-6259-2019
Atmos. Meas. Tech., 12, 6259–6272, 2019
https://doi.org/10.5194/amt-12-6259-2019

Research article 29 Nov 2019

Research article | 29 Nov 2019

Caution with spectroscopic NO2 reference cells (cuvettes)

Ulrich Platt and Jonas Kuhn

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Cited articles

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Short summary
Measurements of atmospheric trace gases by absorption spectroscopy are frequently supported by recording the amount of trace gas in absorption cells. These are typically small glass (or quartz) cylinders containing the gas to be studied. Here we show in the example of NO2-absorption cells that the effective amount of gas seen by the instrument can deviate greatly from expected values (by orders of magnitude in severe cases). Some suggestions for improving the situation are discussed.