Articles | Volume 13, issue 2
Atmos. Meas. Tech., 13, 853–875, 2020
https://doi.org/10.5194/amt-13-853-2020

Special issue: Hydrological cycle in the Mediterranean (ACP/AMT/GMD/HESS/NHESS/OS...

Atmos. Meas. Tech., 13, 853–875, 2020
https://doi.org/10.5194/amt-13-853-2020

Research article 20 Feb 2020

Research article | 20 Feb 2020

Concurrent satellite and ground-based lightning observations from the Optical Lightning Imaging Sensor (ISS-LIS), the low-frequency network Meteorage and the SAETTA Lightning Mapping Array (LMA) in the northwestern Mediterranean region

Felix Erdmann et al.

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Cited articles

Bitzer, P. M., Burchfield, J. C., and Christian, H. J.: A Bayesian Approach to Assess the Performance of Lightning Detection Systems, J. Atmos. Ocean. Tech., 33, 563–578, https://doi.org/10.1175/JTECH-D-15-0032.1, 2016. a, b, c, d, e, f, g
Blakeslee, R. and Koshak, W.: LIS on ISS: Expanded Global Coverage and Enhanced Applications, The Earth Observer, 28, 4–14, 2016. a, b
Blakeslee, R. J., Bailey, J. C., Carey, L., Goodman, S. J., Rudlosky, S., Albrecht, R., Morales, C. A., Anselmo, E., and Neves, J.: São Paulo Lightning Mapping Array (SP-LMA): Network Assessment and Analyses for Intercomparison Studies and GOES-R Proxy Activities, J. Atmos. Ocean. Tech., 19, 1318–1332, 2013. a
Blakeslee, R. J., Mach, D. M., Stewart, M. F., Buechler, D., and Christian, H.: Non-Quality Controlled Lightning Imaging Sensor (LIS) on International Space Station (ISS) Provisional Science Data P0.2, https://doi.org/10.5067/LIS/ISSLIS/DATA204, dataset available online from the NASA Global Hydrology Center DAAC, Huntsville, Alabama, USA, 2017. a, b
Boccippio, D., Koshak, W. J., and Blakeslee, R. J.: Performance Assessment of the Optical Transient Detector and Lightning Imaging Sensor. Part I: Predicted Diurnal Variability, J. Atmos. Ocean. Tech., 19, 1318–1332, https://doi.org/10.1175/1520-0426(2002)019<1318:PAOTOT>2.0.CO;2, 2002. a, b
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Short summary
This article compares lightning observations from an optical sensor onboard the International Space Station to two ground-based networks using different radio frequencies. The location and timing of coincident flashes agree well for the three instruments. Differences exist for the detected number of flashes and the characteristics. Small flashes in particular are not always detected by all three instruments. About half of the flashes at altitudes below 10 km are not seen by the satellite sensor.